Shazeeye's Blog Thoughts on User Experience, Technology and Business

31Mar/116

Trends in Web 2.0: Part 1 of 2

I spent March 29-31 at Web 2.0 Expo hosted at the beautiful Moscone Center in San Francisco. I would like to share my learnings on trends in Web 2.0.

1. Six Web Trends: Kevin Kelly of Wired Magazine identified six web trends that are here to stay: screening, interacting, sharing, flowing, accessing (not owning) and generating (not copying).

Screening refers to screens/interfaces that will dominate areas we never thought of before. For example, virtual phone screens that could be viewed on the palm of our hand and spectacles that could double up as information interfaces. Kevin predicts that one day there will be a single screen for everything - phone, computer, entertainment, navigation, etc.

Interacting refers to the use of modes other than voice, haptic and/or text in communicating with technology. Some other modes could be gestural and eyetracking. He predicts interfaces and humans to be two way communication channels and interfaces will use human input to adapt their layouts to better cater to human needs.

Sharing is going to exponentially grow in the future and will not be limited to sharing information on sleep patterns, locations, health records, etc.

Flowing refers to information in real time. Humans will plug into real time information streams as opposed to static files/pages. Tags will dominate over folders and cloud based services will dominate over web/desktop. Accessing is renting and not owning.  For example, Zipcar, Netflix, renting books, etc. This eliminates maintenance and inventory.

Generating is using operatives that can't be copied. For example, Amazon is in the business of findability and insight (reviews/ratings) not products which can be easily copied. Other generatives could be authentication, personalization, embodiment (see people perform), interpretation (learn how to use) and attention.

Basically, these six verbs describe the future of the web and the money will flow wherever the attention flows.

2. Online Games will be bigger in the future but designing them well is the difference between success and failure. The following core concepts from Amy Jo Kim define 'game thinking':

  1. Know who’s playing – design for their social style such as collaborative (Farmville), competitive or exploratory (ModCloth-online shopping)
  2. Build a system that’s easy to learn and hard to master
  3. Build fun/pleasure/satisfaction into your core activity loop
  4. Use Progress Mechanics to “light the way” towards learning and mastery. Gamers can be novices, regulars or enthusiasts and motivation (badges) for novices, challenges for regulars and exclusivity/recognition for enthusiasts are used as progressive mechanisms
  5. Design for Onboarding, Habit-Building, and Elder Game
  6. As players progress, unlock greater challenges, customization and privileges
  7. Give players real power via stats, voting, earned roles, & crowd-sourcing

3. User Experience differentiates your company from another: For example among the online travel sites hipmunk looks at a factor called Agony which is a combination of price, duration and number of stops which truly captures a traveler's experience.

You can continue reading the other trends here.

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Comments (6) Trackbacks (0)
  1. I’m not easily impressed. . . but that’s impressing me! :)

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  3. Hello, I am a usability researcher (academic) who is very interested in using co.he.valuate in my classes. It is available for use?

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    • Hello Sharon, Thank you for your interest. I would love to share co.he.valuate but the tool is only available for use at Infosys, the company I worked at. Infosys owns the Intellectual Property rights of the tool.


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