Shazeeye's Blog Thoughts on User Experience, Technology and Business

30Mar/120

Indicating Interest Online Quantitatively

Attention and interest on the web are critical metrics and are an essential component that should guide any online strategy.  LinkedIn has done an excellent job in this area of indicating interest quantitatively. Let us look at a few examples:

Indicating interest in you/your profile by showing how many looked at your profile. Indicating interest in a job by showing how many people clicked on the Apply button.  Indicating interest in your connections by showing how many changed jobs in a year.

There are some other examples in the online retail industry. For example, Rue La La indicates interest in their products (clothing, accessories, home goods, etc.) by letting us know how many Ralph Lauren sweaters are left to buy thus indicating how quickly a product is getting sold. We also measure interest (though not shown quantitatively) by grouping stuff under most popular, most commented and most shared on various blogs and news sites.

The theme of the third largest social network, Pinterest (Facebook and Twitter are the top two) is centered around interest. Interest is indicated quantitatively through likes, repins and comments. We need to have a measure of interest by consolidating our online behavior (sharing, commenting, viewing, etc.). Let me know if you have any ideas on how to measure interest.

27May/110

Usability Metrics: Measuring the user experience

Usability is making a product or website easy to use so that a user can complete his/her goals without getting frustrated. Usability metrics give structure to the design process and inform decision makers. As a usability expert we aim to execute a 'wow' experience by measuring effectiveness (can you complete the task?), efficiency (can you complete it with minimum effort and time?), learnability (how quickly can you learn to do it?) and satisfaction (how happy or satisfied are you with the experience?).

Two people in this field have motivated me- Jeffrey Sauro and Tom Tullis. Jeff wrote an exceptional paper on standardizing usability metrics into a single score. Tom Tullis is a true usability guru with whom I've had the wonderful opportunity to work with at Fidelity Investments. His book 'Measuring the User Experience' is a must read for anyone trying to create a 'wow' user experience. Insights in this post are from his book and my experience. The metrics are defined in detail below.

Efficiency: can be measured through task completion success (successful or not), task completion time, number of clicks to complete tasks, number of page views and comparing user performance  to expert performance

Effectiveness: can be measured through lostness (number of steps a user takes to complete a task relative to minimum number of steps to complete a task), intuitiveness (percentage of items placed in correct menu category using a card sort), awareness (did you notice it? a memory test to repeat what the person noticed or an eye tracking test),  log data checks (live user data is analyzed to study where users fail or are having issues with the task), A/B testing (test 2 design concepts to identify which is more effective), number of issues based on severity and frequency which can also be categorized into user interface parameters such as navigation issues, terminology issues, interaction issues, etc.

Learnability: or the ease of learning a new product/website can be measured by the time it takes someone to be proficient with the product.

Satisfaction and other metrics: self reported metrics (through rating scales, qualitative feedback and online survey tools) on various factors such as satisfaction, ease-of-use, engagement and enjoyment. It could also measure a call to action such as the probability of purchasing the product or recommending it to a friend. Physiological factors such as heart rate changes, eye tracking and sentiment analysis are some other ways to measure the experience.

Tom Tullis has a neat image of when to use each metric or combination of metrics in his book.

Want an easy-to-use metric? The System Usability Scale (SUS) is an easy way to measure the usability of any product/website. Ask users to complete a task or a few critical tasks and give them this questionnaire to rate. You can calculate the SUS Score which could range from 0-100. A score of 80+ is good usability but for a more detailed interpretation read this paper.

12Nov/104

Web Analytics to Track your Blog

This post is dedicated to my loyal readers! Thank you for patiently waiting for each post (yes I know it's just 2 posts/month). So the question is how do I know I have loyal blog readers? I know because I am tracking my blog with software and I'm here to tell you about it. As of now all the tools listed below are free and the scope of this post of this post is limited to free blog tracking tools. Let's get started!

1. Google Analytics - my favorite free blog tracking tool as it has a wealth of information. With this tool you can answer the following questions.

Content metrics: Which posts interest my readers? Which posts do they spend more time on? Which posts do not interest users? For example, the image on the right shows content metrics for the first month of starting my blog. Readers were most interested in my portfolio (most page views) followed by my bio (about me) and the post on 'trust and e-commerce homepages'. A further look shows  that the post on  'listen to your customers' was not as highly viewed (22 vs. 81 views) as the post on 'trust and e-commerce homepages' but readers spent more time on 'listen to your customers' (4.17 minutes vs. 1.39 minutes) and it had a lower bounce rate (bounce rate= when someone immediate leaves the page/blog after they have come to the post) which is also a critical metric of interest. Bounce rates below 30% for any post or blog are preferred as it means your audience is engaged in your content and is not leaving the blog. Bounce rates can also be high if the audience is not your target audience though your content is good. Page Analytics shows  readers clicked (in pink on image above) on my blog's home page more than my portfolio and bio page. This will help you understand which links get more attention from your readers.

Traffic sources: It's equally important to monitor your traffic sources to attract traffic as it is to write great content. A summary of my traffic sources for 3 months (since my blog's birth) shows organic traffic (readers who type my name in a search engine to come to my blog)  and direct traffic (readers who open a browser and type my blog address) to be highest which is natural. I also get traffic from social media (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Stumble Upon and Hootsuite) and Blog directories (Blog Search and Blogged). The more effort I put into finding channels to send traffic to my blog the better my outreach but I should also be aware of targeting the right audience through these channels. For example, the bounce rates and average time on my blog indicate LinkedIn, Facebook and Organic sources to be good traffic sources but Twitter and direct traffic to not be good traffic sources. This could mean I'm not attracting the right audience on my Twitter and my readers want more frequent updates on my blog as they have nothing new to read other than the 2 posts/month. It's also important to monitor  the keywords that readers put into search engines to come to your blog. For example, the image above shows the keywords and the corresponding times spent on my blog. Google Adwords (not shown) identifies which keywords people most search for in my field.  Once, I identify these keywords I can tailor my content accordingly and thus get more traffic.

Visitors: My blog has about 50% new and 50% returning visitors. I am extremely interested in 2 metrics: visitor loyalty and visitor depth. The images below indicate that I have a loyal following and 70% of my readers visit my blog 8 or more times. 55% of my readers read 2 or more pages on my blog. Thank you my loyal and interested visitors!

2. Bit.ly- This tool measures the number of readers who clicked on a link that you shared. You could share this link on Facebook, Twitter or your Blog. The link could be an image, a link to a blog post or a video. For example, of all my links that I have shared on Twitter, Facebook, Shazeeye's Blog or LinkedIn the link that got the most interest (maximum clicks) was the one on "25 Most Influential Business Women in San Francisco" that I shared on Twitter (@shazeeye).

3. PercentMobile- a critical tool to monitor your mobile traffic. I have not done well in this area and I'm changing that immediately. For example, I had 39 visitors who came to my blog last month using 6 different mobile devices and unfortunatley as my blog was not easy to read on the mobile device 97% left immediately. I lost important traffic. Though I use a free wordpress plugin - WPtouch- to make it easy to read on a mobile device it has not worked well for me so I've finally decided to buy my first tool -WPtouch Pro.

4. Google Feedburner- measures the number of subscribers to your blog.

5. UserVoice- moderates and tracks user comments at a post and page level on your blog. These will be the orange tabs you see near my portfolio and bio page. Now that it's established that this blog has a few fans do you want to show me some love and post a comment using the comment form below. Thanks!

Where can I find these tools?

Google Analytics, Bit.ly, PercentMobile, Google Feedburner, Google Adwords and User Voice

Instructions to add these tools?

Google Analytics, Bit.ly, PercentMobile (sign up and it guides you through the process), Google Feedburner, Google Adwords and User Voice

If you know of any tools that I forgot to write about please let me know.

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