Shazeeye's Blog Thoughts on User Experience, Technology and Business

31Oct/110

Growth Strategies and Managing Differences in a Global Economy

As more businesses become global companies face challenges in balancing local conditions with economies of scale. The AAA framework by Pankaj Ghemawat is one way to address this challenge. The three A's stand for Adaptation, Aggregation and Arbitrage. Adaptation boosts revenue and market share by maximizing a firm's local presence such as Mc Donald's in India has adapted its menu to suit Indian tastes by providing the McAloo Tikki burger (spicy potato burger). Aggregation standardizes the firm's product or service offerings by grouping together production processes. Apple manufactures its products in China and markets its products in the US.  Arbitrage exploits the differences between regional markets such as call centers in India, factories in China and retail stores in Western Europe.

A firm can choose one of these strategies or a combination. It can also shift strategies at different points in its evolution. IBM started with the adaptation strategy by setting up mini IBMs in target countries and adapting to local needs. In the 1980s it transformed to a regional dependent organization thus shifting to the aggregation strategy. Most recently it shifted to the arbitrage strategy by exploiting wage differentials in India and increasing its headcount in India.

Which globalization option does a firm choose?

In making this decision managers can use the AAA triangle to make a decision. Firms that do a lot of advertising will need to adapt to the local market and lean more towards the adaptation strategy. Those that do a lot of R&D will use the aggregation strategy and firms that are labor intensive will use the arbitrage strategy. Though firms can use a matrix approach and have two strategies in place employing all three has its constraints in terms of limited managerial capacity and a confused culture. It is important to ensure the strategy is a good organizational fit. A firm could also get external support to integrate across borders. IBM has many vendors and joint ventures to help with its R&D and manufacturing. It is also critical to know when not to integrate as this minimizes points of contact and friction. Choosing to use or not use these strategies can help or hinder a  firm's global growth plans.

Related posts:

  1. Managing Disruptive Innovation
  2. Useful Frameworks to Drive your Business Strategy – Part 1 of 2
  3. Using a Balanced Scrorecard to Drive your Company’s Strategy
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